Hoe Cakes

Sep 22, 2013 by

 

What are hoe cakes? No it’s not what you think it is ;). Hoe cakes are often associated with the American South, where hoe cakes are served with a variety of sweet and savory foods. There are several explanations where hoe cakes came from. Some food historians use ex-slave narratives as proof that hoe cakes are called that because they were cooked on the back of a hoe. Others believe the name hoe cake comes not from the slaves cooking the cornmeal on a metal hoe, but rather from an earlier meaning of the word hoe, which was synonymous with griddle. Found this recipe in the Garden and Gun magazine and didn’t change a thing. Some things are better left alone. 

Ingredients

1 cup self-rising flour
1 cup fine yellow cornmeal
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tbsp sugar
2/3 cup buttermilk
1/3 cup water
1/4 cup bacon fat
1/3 cup sour cream
2 eggs
1/3 cup green onions, thinly sliced
1/4 cup crisp bacon, finely chopped
Canola oil, combined with some bacon fat.

Instructions

1. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, baking powder, salt, and sugar.

2. In another small bowl, combine buttermilk, water, bacon fat, and sour cream. Blend well. Add eggs, and mix until just combined.

3. Pour liquid into dry ingredients, and mix just until a thick batter has formed. Stir in the chopped green onions and bacon. To keep the hoecakes tender, avoid over-mixing.

4. Heat oil and bacon fat in a cast-iron or other heavy skillet over medium to medium-high heat. Use about an eighth of a cup of batter for smaller cakes, or a quarter cup for larger ones. Cook them as you would pancakes, allowing them to fry on one side for about three minutes or until crisp and golden brown. Flip and cook for another couple of minutes. Replenish oil as needed, to maintain a generous film in the pan.

5. Batter will keep for a couple of days tightly covered in the refrigerator. If it seems too thick after storing, stir in a bit more buttermilk or water.

Yields 10

Hoe Cakes

20 minPrep Time

5 minCook Time

25 minTotal Time

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Recipe Image

Ingredients

  • 1 cup self-rising flour
  • 1 cup fine yellow cornmeal
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tbsp sugar
  • 2/3 cup buttermilk
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1/4 cup bacon fat
  • 1/3 cup sour cream
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/3 cup green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup crisp bacon, finely chopped
  • Canola oil, combined with some bacon fat.

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, baking powder, salt, and sugar.
  2. In another small bowl, combine buttermilk, water, bacon fat, and sour cream. Blend well. Add eggs, and mix until just combined.
  3. Pour liquid into dry ingredients, and mix just until a thick batter has formed. Stir in the chopped green onions and bacon. To keep the hoecakes tender, avoid over-mixing.
  4. Heat oil and bacon fat in a cast-iron or other heavy skillet over medium to medium-high heat. Use about an eighth of a cup of batter for smaller cakes, or a quarter cup for larger ones. Cook them as you would pancakes, allowing them to fry on one side for about three minutes or until crisp and golden brown. Flip and cook for another couple of minutes. Replenish oil as needed, to maintain a generous film in the pan.
  5. Batter will keep for a couple of days tightly covered in the refrigerator. If it seems too thick after storing, stir in a bit more buttermilk or water. Found this recipe in the Garden and Gun magazine and didn't change a thing. Some things are better left alone.
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http://arrisje.com/hoe-cakes/

 

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Maque Choux

May 6, 2012 by

Maque choux, pronounced mock shoe, is a vegetable side dish popular in the South region of the United States, particularly among the residents of southern Louisiana. The ingredients commonly include corn, onions, green bell pepper and tomatoes. Some recipes call for the addition of garlic and celery. All the ingredients are normally braised until they soften and then hot sauce or cayenne pepper is added to enhance the flavors of the vegetables.

The origins of the term maque choux are not clearly defined. The phrase can be traced to Cajun French and may have been influenced by the word machica, which is a Spanish term for a traditional dish of toasted corn meal. Other sources cite the Cajun French word maigrchou, which means thin child, as the root for the term, based on a variation of maque choux that is commonly thinned with milk or cream and resembles a soup. Another possible origin of the phrase is moque-chou, which when translated from the French language means mock cabbage, indicating that cabbage may once have been included in the recipe.

Ingredients

2 cups of fresh clean corn
1/2 cup cream
6 strips of bacon
1 small onion, chopped
1 medium tomato, chopped
1/2 bell pepper, chopped
1 green onion
1 tsp Louisiana hot sauce

Instructions

Clean corn. Cut the bacon into small strips, add the bacon to the skillet with the minced onion and cutup bell pepper cook until slightly crunchy. Add the sliced tomato and corn, when tender add the cream and the Louisiana hot sauce. Top off with the sliced green onion.

Maque Choux

10 minPrep Time

20 minCook Time

30 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 2 cups of fresh clean corn
  • 1/2 cup cream
  • 6 strips of bacon
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 medium tomato, chopped
  • 1/2 bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 green onion
  • 1 tsp Louisiana hot sauce

Instructions

  1. Clean corn. Cut the bacon into small strips, add the bacon to the skillet with the minced onion and cutup bell pepper cook until slightly crunchy. Add the sliced tomato and corn, when tender add the cream and the Louisiana hot sauce. Top off with the sliced green onion.
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http://arrisje.com/maque-choux/

 

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Recipe Card Maque Choux

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Succotash

Apr 24, 2012 by

True succotash contains lima beans and corn. The rest seems to be up for grabs. Succotash is thought to be one of the first recipes the Algonquin Indians taught the settlers at Plymouth Rock. Succotash was also made by the Narragansett Indians, who called it misckquitash, which means “boiled corn”. It is notable that the two primary ingredients are two of the main agricultural crops of many Native American tribes.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of frozen corn
  • 1/2 bag of frozen lima beans
  • 1/2 red bell pepper
  • 1/2 green bell pepper
  • 4 green onions
  • 1 sm onion
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 4 strips of bacon
  • 1/2 cup of chicken broth or cream

Instructions

  1. Cut up the bacon, bell pepper, red pepper , green onion and onion. Put in a skillet 2 tbsp olive oil, add the bellpepper and onions. Cook for about 5 min,. then add the bacon cook another 5 min. Add corn to the pan and yes cook another 5 min, (Now if you use fresh corn and lima beans. you need to cook them separate for about 10 minutes or until tender) Add the lima beans and cook another 5 min. Stir in the thyme pepper and salt according to your taste. Add the cream or chicken broth and cook for another 5 min.

Succotash
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Recipe Image

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of frozen corn
  • 1/2 bag of frozen lima beans
  • 1/2 red bell pepper
  • 1/2 green bell pepper
  • 4 green onions
  • 1 sm onion
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 4 strips of bacon
  • 1/2 cup of chicken broth or cream

Instructions

  1. Cut up the bacon, bell pepper, red pepper , green onion and onion. Put in a skillet 2 tbsp olive oil, add the bellpepper and onions. Cook for about 5 min,. then add the bacon cook another 5 min. Add corn to the pan and yes cook another 5 min, (Now if you use fresh corn and lima beans. you need to cook them separate for about 10 minutes or until tender) Add the lima beans and cook another 5 min. Stir in the thyme pepper and salt according to your taste. Add the cream or chicken broth and cook for another 5 min.
7.6.3
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http://arrisje.com/succotash-2/

 

 

*Arrisje’s Recipe Card. Click on the pic below and save to your hard drive. Print as a 4×6 picture*

Succotash recipe card

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