Succotash

Apr 24, 2012 by

True succotash contains lima beans and corn. The rest seems to be up for grabs. Succotash is thought to be one of the first recipes the Algonquin Indians taught the settlers at Plymouth Rock. Succotash was also made by the Narragansett Indians, who called it misckquitash, which means “boiled corn”. It is notable that the two primary ingredients are two of the main agricultural crops of many Native American tribes.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of frozen corn
  • 1/2 bag of frozen lima beans
  • 1/2 red bell pepper
  • 1/2 green bell pepper
  • 4 green onions
  • 1 sm onion
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 4 strips of bacon
  • 1/2 cup of chicken broth or cream

Instructions

  1. Cut up the bacon, bell pepper, red pepper , green onion and onion. Put in a skillet 2 tbsp olive oil, add the bellpepper and onions. Cook for about 5 min,. then add the bacon cook another 5 min. Add corn to the pan and yes cook another 5 min, (Now if you use fresh corn and lima beans. you need to cook them separate for about 10 minutes or until tender) Add the lima beans and cook another 5 min. Stir in the thyme pepper and salt according to your taste. Add the cream or chicken broth and cook for another 5 min.

Succotash
 
Ingredients
  • 1 cup of frozen corn
  • ½ bag of frozen lima beans
  • ½ red bell pepper
  • ½ green bell pepper
  • 4 green onions
  • 1 sm onion
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 4 strips of bacon
  • ½ cup of chicken broth or cream
Instructions
  1. Cut up the bacon, bell pepper, red pepper , green onion and onion. Put in a skillet 2 tbsp olive oil, add the bellpepper and onions. Cook for about 5 min,. then add the bacon cook another 5 min. Add corn to the pan and yes cook another 5 min, (Now if you use fresh corn and lima beans. you need to cook them separate for about 10 minutes or until tender) Add the lima beans and cook another 5 min. Stir in the thyme pepper and salt according to your taste. Add the cream or chicken broth and cook for another 5 min.

 

 

*Arrisje’s Recipe Card. Click on the pic below and save to your hard drive. Print as a 4×6 picture*

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Atjar Tjampoer (Indonesian)

Apr 21, 2012 by

Atjar Tjampoer is an Indonesian sweet and sour dish. As the word Tjampoer (mixed) already says Atjar Tjampoer is a mixed pickled vegetable dish. The fresh flavor of Atjar is a good combination with spicy dishes. It is delicious with Nasi or Bahmi, satay and Babi Pangang, and as well with other dishes, like a hot dog 😉

In the US they have something similar which is called chow chow. The difference is the seasonings. With chow chow mustard seeds and celery seeds are used.

Ingredients

4 cups shredded cabbage
2 cups shredded carrots
3 cups bean sprouts
3 green onions
1/2 English Cucumber
1/2 Bell Pepper
2 tbsp crushed garlic
2 tsp Sambal Oelek
3 tsp ginger
3 tsp turmeric
1 -1/2 cups white vinegar
1 cup sugar
pinch of salt

Instructions

1.  You can buy the cabbage and carrots already shredded, or shred it yourself. Cut up the green onions and Bell Pepper. Cut the cucumber in half and take the seeds out and cut in small pieces.

2.   Put water in a pot and add a pinch of salt. When the water comes to a boil add the shredded cabbage and carrots. Cook for 5 minutes. Take the cabbage and carrots out and let it drain in the strainer. Add the bean sprouts to the boiling water and boil for 3 minutes. Take them out and add to the strainer. Then add the green vegetables (green onions, bell pepper and the cucumber) to the boiling water also boil for 2 min. Add them on top of all the other vegetables.

3.   Heat the sunflower oil in a pan. Fry the Sambal Oelek, garlic, turmeric and ginger for 2 minutes. Add the vinegar and sugar; stir till the sugar is dissolved. Add all the vegetables boil softly for 2 minutes. Put in a bowl and let cool.

4. You can also preserve the Atjar, the dishwasher is fine for the jars; especially if it has a “sanitize” cycle. I get that going while I’m preparing everything else, so it’s done by the time I’m ready to fill the jars. Put the hot vegetables in sterilized screw-lid jars (metal lids with a ‘dome’ in the middle are handy) Screw the lids on. Place jars upside down until cooled completely the ‘dome’ in the lid will be down, this is to check if the jar closed well. Can be kept for at least a year store in a dark place to avoid having the color goes away.

 

 

*My Recipe Card. Click on the pic below, save to your hard drive and print as a 4×6 picture*

Atjar Tjampoer Recipe Card


Atjar Tjampoer
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Atjar Tjampoer is an Indonesian sweet and sour dish. As the word Tjampoer (mixed) already says Atjar Tjampoer is a mixed pickled vegetable dish. The fresh flavor of Atjar is a good combination with spicy dishes. It is delicious with Nasi or Bahmi, satay and Babi Pangang, and as well with other dishes, like a hot dog 😉 In the US they have something similar which is called chow chow. The difference is the seasonings. With chow chow mustard seeds and celery seeds are used.
Author:
Recipe type: Condiment
Cuisine: Indonesian
Ingredients
  • 4 cups shredded cabbage
  • 2 cups shredded carrots
  • 3 cups bean sprouts
  • 3 green onions
  • ½ English Cucumber
  • ½ Bell Pepper
  • 2 tbsp crushed garlic
  • 2 tsp Sambal Oelek
  • 3 tsp ginger
  • 3 tsp turmeric
  • 1 -1/2 cups white vinegar
  • 1 cup sugar
  • pinch of salt
Instructions
  1. You can buy the cabbage and carrots already shredded, or shred it yourself. Cut up the green onions and Bell Pepper. Cut the cucumber in half and take the seeds out and cut in small pieces.
  2. Put water in a pot and add a pinch of salt. When the water comes to a boil add the shredded cabbage and carrots. Cook for 5 minutes. Take the cabbage and carrots out and let it drain in the strainer. Add the bean sprouts to the boiling water and boil for 3 minutes. Take them out and add to the strainer. Then add the green vegetables (green onions, bell pepper and the cucumber) to the boiling water also boil for 2 min. Add them on top of all the other vegetables.
  3. Heat the sunflower oil in a pan. Fry the Sambal Oelek, garlic, turmeric and ginger for 2 minutes. Add the vinegar and sugar; stir till the sugar is dissolved. Add all the vegetables boil softly for 2 minutes. Put in a bowl and let cool.
  4. You can also preserve the Atjar, the dishwasher is fine for the jars; especially if it has a "sanitize" cycle. I get that going while I'm preparing everything else, so it's done by the time I'm ready to fill the jars. Put the hot vegetables in sterilized screw-lid jars (metal lids with a 'dome' in the middle are handy) Screw the lids on. Place jars upside down until cooled completely the 'dome' in the lid will be down, this is to check if the jar closed well. Can be kept for at least a year store in a dark place to avoid having the color goes away.

 

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Pico de Gallo

Jan 21, 2012 by

Pico de gallo can be used in much the same way as other Mexican salsas, Kenyan Kachumbari or Indian chutneys, but since it contains less liquid, it can also be used as a main ingredient in dishes such as tacos and fajitas.

In some regions of Mexico, a fruit salad (watermelon, orange, jicama, cucumber and sometimes melon and papaya) tossed in lime juice and hot sauce or chamoy and sprinkled with a salty chili powder is also known as pico de gallo; it is a popular snack and usually sold outside schools, while the tomato-based condiment is better known as salsa picada, which means minced or chopped sauce, salsa bandera or salsa mexicana, because the colors red (tomato), white (onion), and green (chili) are the colors of the Mexican flag.

One of the sources for the name “rooster’s beak” could be the beak-like shape and the red color of the chilis used to make it. According to food writer Sharon Tyler Herbst,it is so called because originally it was eaten with the thumb and forefinger, and retrieving and eating the condiment resembled the actions of a pecking rooster.

Another suggested etymology is that pico is derived from the verb picar, which has two meanings: 1) to mince or chop, and 2) to bite, sting or peck. The rooster, gallo in Spanish, is a common metaphor for the hyper-masculine (“macho”) male in Mexican culture. One example of such machismo is taking pride in withstanding the spicy burn of chilis.

However, neither theory can be considered definite, as they assume the use of hot chilis. In many regions of Mexico the term “pico de gallo” refers to any of a variety of salads, condiments or fillings made with sweet fruits, tomatoes, tomatillos, avocado or mild chilis — not necessarily with hot chilis, or any chilis at all. Thus, the name could be a simple allusion to the bird feed-like minced texture and appearance of the sauce.

The source of this article is wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Ingredients

1 mango
1/3 cup chopped cilantro (if you don’t like cilantro use parsley)
2 green onions
1/2 small onion minced
2 chopped tomatoes
1 Anaheim pepper
1/2 tsp pepper
1/8 tsp salt
2 tbsp lemon juice

Instructions

1.   Chop up all the vegetables and fruit, add the lemon juice, pepper and salt. Put in the refrigerator so it can marinate for at least an hour. You can add this to your taco’s fajita’s or eat it like a dip.

 

*My Recipe Card. Click on the pic below, save to your hard drive,print as a 4×6 pic*

Recipe Card Pico de Gallo


Pico de Gallo
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Snack/Appetizer
Cuisine: TexMex
Ingredients
  • 1 mango
  • ⅓ cup chopped cilantro (if you don't like cilantro use parsley)
  • 2 green onions
  • ½ small onion minced
  • 2 chopped tomatoes
  • 1 Anaheim pepper
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • ⅛ tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Chop up all the vegetables and fruit, add the lemon juice, pepper and salt. Put in the refrigerator so it can marinate for at least an hour. You can add this to your taco's fajita's or eat it like a dip.

 

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Purple Cabbage (Dutch)

Dec 30, 2011 by

Red, Purple Cabbage: cabbage gets its color from a pigment called anthocyanin as do all red, blue, and purple plants. Red cabbage was even grown in the Middle Ages when botanists learned to encourage its special color feature.

In its raw state, cabbage contains iron, calcium, and potassium. High marks are given for its vitamin C content. Cabbage is also high in vitamins B1, B2, and B3. Lengthy cooking tends to lower the nutritional value considerably.

Red cabbage is higher in fiber than green, with 4 ounces of it boiled and drained offering 2.7 grams. It’s higher in vitamin C, offering 25.8 milligrams for 4 ounces cooked. Red cabbage is also higher in calcium, iron, and potassium than its green cousin.

Savoy and napa cabbage can boast they contain 20% of the RDA for vitamin A, while red and green cabbages contain considerably less. Bok choy contains the most vitamin A, supplying 60% of the RDA, although it is equal to red and green cabbage in other nutrients.

Pickling is an excellent way to preserve the vitamin C in cabbage. In fact, Captain Cook attributed his crew’s good health to a daily ration of sauerkraut.

Purple Cabbage: (Rode Kool) Is another recipe of my mom, this is the kind of food I grew up with. The pictures are not doing justice to this easy recipe.

Ingredients

1/2 purple cabbage
3 small apples or 2 large apples
2 tbsp sugar
1/8 tsp ground cloves if you have whole cloves add 2
1 tbsp vinegar( red or apple)
1/2 minced onion
1/4cup rice
1 bay leaf
1 tsp salt

1. Remove the outer leaves of the cabbage and take the core out. Cut the cabbage into thin strips place them with enough water to cover the cabbag in the pot. Add to the pot the chopped onion and apple, cloves sugar and vinegar. Bring to a boil at the highest setting and let the cabbage cook 50 minutes on medium high. When the cabbage has been cooking for 30 min add the rice, that will thicken the liquid. If you don’t want to use rice you can add diluted cornstarch. Add salt to your taste.

Purple Cabbage
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Ingredients
  • ½ purple cabbage
  • 3 small apples or 2 large apples
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • ⅛ tsp ground cloves if you have whole cloves add 2
  • 1 tbsp vinegar( red or apple)
  • ½ minced onion
  • ¼cup rice
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 tsp salt
Instructions
  1. Remove the outer leaves of the cabbage and take the core out. Cut the cabbage into thin strips place them with enough water to cover the cabbag in the pot. Add to the pot the chopped onion and apple, cloves sugar and vinegar. Bring to a boil at the highest setting and let the cabbage cook 50 minutes on medium high. When the cabbage has been cooking for 30 min add the rice, that will thicken the liquid. If you don't want to use rice you can add diluted cornstarch. Add salt to your taste.

Recipe Card Purple Cabbage

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The Best Collard Greens you will ever Make

Nov 30, 2011 by

Collards, also called collard greens or borekale (Brassica oleracea Acephala Group), are various loose-leafed cultivars of the cabbage plant. The plant is grown for its large, dark-colored, edible leaves and as a garden ornamental, mainly in Brazil, Portugal, the Southern United States, many parts of Africa, Montenegro, Spain and in Kashmir as well. They are classified in the same cultivar group as kale and spring greens, to which they are extremely similar genetically.

The plant is also called couve in Brazil, couve-galega in Portugal, (col) berza in Spanish-speaking countries and Raštan in Montenegro. The name collard is said to derive from Anglo-Saxon coleworts or colewyrts (“cabbage plants”). It is also said that collard is a pidginized version of colored.

Only firm, dark green leaves are fit for consumption; any wilted or yellowish leaves must be discarded. Collards have higher nutritional value when cooked than when raw due to the tough cell structure; they can be blended into a juice, usually in combination with sweet fruit juices to improve the flavor. Collards are usually consumed cooked, as meal fillers and as a source of dietary fiber, especially as a balance to fish and meat dishes.

 

Ingredients

  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 2 lb collard greens
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1 tsp celery seeds
  • 1 tbsp chopped garlic
  • 1 tbsp chicken base if you don’t have that 1 bouillon cube of Knorr
  • 8 strips of bacon
  • 1 chopped onion
  • 1 tbsp sugar

 

Instructions

  1. If you don’t buy the collard greens in a bag, which are already cleaned. Then you need to clean the collards
  2. Cut up the onion and garlic.
  3. Put in a large pot the chicken broth about 4 cups.
  4. Add the cut up bacon, onion, garlic, red pepper flakes, celery seeds, and chicken base or bouillon cube.
  5. Add the collards and the sugar, cook till done.
  6. You can tell when the collards are done by the color of the vegetables (see pic) this took about 1 hour. Some take hours just taste them as long they are not tough.  If you like you can mix the greens up like adding turnip greens and or kale.

Collard Greens
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Ingredients
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 2 lb collard greens
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1 tsp celery seeds
  • 1 tbsp chopped garlic
  • 1 tbsp chicken base if you don't have that 1 bouillon cube of Knorr
  • 8 strips of bacon
  • 1 chopped onion
  • 1 tbsp sugar
Instructions
  1. If you don't buy the collard greens in a bag, which are already cleaned. Then you need to clean the collards
  2. Cut up the onion and garlic.
  3. Put in a large pot the chicken broth about 4 cups.
  4. Add the cut up bacon, onion, garlic, red pepper flakes, celery seeds, and chicken base or bouillon cube.
  5. Add the collards and the sugar, cook till done.
  6. You can tell when the collards are done by the color of the vegetables (see pic) this took about 1 hour. If you like you can mix the greens up like adding turnip greens and or kale.

 

Arrisje’s Recipe Card 4×6 * Save to your hard drive, then print as 4×6 picture *

 

 

 

 

 

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