Honey Chipotle Sauce

Apr 4, 2012 by

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 2 tsp ground chipotle chile pepper powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tbsp hot sauce

Instructions

  1. Make honey-chipotle sauce by combining all ingredients in a small saucepan over medium heat until boiling.Reduce heat and simmer for 2 minutes, then remove from heat.

Honey Chipotle Sauce

5 minPrep Time

5 minCook Time

10 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 2 tsp ground chipotle chile pepper powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tbsp hot sauce

Instructions

  1. Make honey-chipotle sauce by combining all ingredients in a small saucepan over medium heat until boiling.Reduce heat and simmer for 2 minutes, then remove from heat.
Cuisine: American | Recipe Type: Sauce
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Kibbeling

Apr 3, 2012 by

In the Netherlands, in addition to the snackbars, one can also find street stalls selling different fried, smoked and raw fish products called a “viskraam”. Besides the popular raw herring served with chopped onions, these stalls also sell fish products such as smoked mackerel, smoked eel and “kibbeling” (deep fried cod nuggets).

Kibbeling is a snack consisting of pieces of cod in a batter of flour and egg, dipped and then fried.

The high price of cod is now often worked with other species such as pollack, whiting. Kibbeling is often eaten with garlic sauce or remoulade.

“Kibbeling” is a corruption of the word “cod cheeks.” These cheeks are cut separately and were once as “kibbeling” offered. Later the belly pieces of large minnows (cod, pollock, etc.) are also sold as “kibbeling”.

When you make this Kibbeling do not use a deep fryer with a mesh basket. I found out the hard way, the battered fish kept sticking to the basket. So the next time I make it I will use a deep skillet.

Ingredients

For the batter:
1/2 lb cod pp.
1 cup flour
1/2 cup milk
1 egg
canola oil

Fish seasoning mix:
1 tbsp basil
1 tbsp dill weed
1 tbsp onion powder
1/2 tbsp garlic
1/2 tsp celery seeds
1/2 tsp oregano
1/8 tsp lemon peel
1/8 tsp black pepper

For the garlic sauce:
1/2 cup sour cream
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1 tbsp crushed garlic
1 tsp dill weed

Instructions
Rinse the cod in some water. Mix your fish seasonings. Cut up the cod in bite size pieces then mix the milk, flour and egg. Add your seasoning mix to the cod. In the meantime heat the canola oil in a deep skillet 375F. Dip the cod in the batter and fry the cod in the oil for about 4 min or until brown. For the sauce you mix the mayo, sour cream, garlic and dill weed. Serve the cod with the garlic sauce

Kibbeling

15 minPrep Time

4 minCook Time

19 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

    For the batter:
  • 1/2 lb cod pp.
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 egg
  • canola oil
  • Fish seasoning mix:
  • 1 tbsp basil
  • 1 tbsp dill weed
  • 1 tbsp onion powder
  • 1/2 tbsp garlic
  • 1/2 tsp celery seeds
  • 1/2 tsp oregano
  • 1/8 tsp lemon peel
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper
  • For the garlic sauce:
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tbsp crushed garlic
  • 1 tsp dill weed

Instructions

  1. Rinse the cod in some water. Mix your fish seasonings. Cut up the cod in bite size pieces then mix the milk, flour and egg. Add your seasoning mix to the cod. In the meantime heat the canola oil in a deep skillet 375F. Dip the cod in the batter and fry the cod in the oil for about 4 min or until brown. For the sauce you mix the mayo, sour cream, garlic and dill weed. Serve the cod with the garlic sauce.
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Potato Balls

Apr 1, 2012 by

It happens to all of us that we make too much food. I don’t know about you but I hate to throw away food. So what to do with all these mashed potatoes. This is a good recipe for leftover mashed potatoes and not to mention it’s easy to make. Who doesn’t like easy recipes 🙂

Ingredients

  • 3 cups of mashed potatoes
  • 1/3 cup dried onion
  • 3 oz. cream cheese
  • 2/3 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1 cup of bread crumbs
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. I am using leftover mashed potatoes for this dish. In a large bowl add 1/3 cup of Parmesan Cheese, cream cheese, and seasonings to the mashed potatoes. Mix the breadcrumbs with 1/3 cup of Parmesan Cheese. Roll the potato balls in Parmesan cheese breadcrumb mixture, until well coated and place on a plate with wax paper. (wax paper is necessary so the balls won’t stick to the plate when you freeze them) Continue making balls until all is gone.Bake in 350F oven for 15 to 20 minutes until lightly browned
  2. Flash freeze these potato balls, by putting them in the freezer for about an hour. Once the balls are frozen you can place them in plastic bags or containers and store in the freezer.
  3. To use the potato balls, remove as many as needed and place in a dish. Bake in 350F oven for 15 to 20 minutes until lightly browned

Potato Balls

15 minPrep Time

15 minCook Time

30 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 3 cups of mashed potatoes
  • 1/3 cup dried onion
  • 3 oz. cream cheese
  • 2/3 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1 cup of bread crumbs
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. I am using leftover mashed potatoes for this dish. In a large bowl add 1/3 cup of Parmesan Cheese, cream cheese, and seasonings to the mashed potatoes. Mix the breadcrumbs with 1/3 cup of Parmesan Cheese. Roll the potato balls in Parmesan cheese breadcrumb mixture, until well coated and place on a plate with wax paper. (wax paper is necessary so the balls won't stick to the plate when you freeze them) Continue making balls until all is gone.Bake in 350F oven for 15 to 20 minutes until lightly browned
  2. Flash freeze these potato balls, by putting them in the freezer for about an hour. Once the balls are frozen you can place them in plastic bags or containers and store in the freezer.
  3. To use the potato balls, remove as many as needed and place in a dish. Bake in 350F oven for 15 to 20 minutes until lightly browned
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Lady Finger Cookies

Mar 27, 2012 by

Lady finger Cookies are light and sweet sponge cakes roughly shaped like a large finger. They are called savoiardi in Italian (meaning “from Savoy”), or in French biscuits à la cuillère or boudoirs. In the UK they may be called sponge-fingers, trifle sponges or boudoir biscuits. In Persian they are called latifeh . In Dutch, they are called lange vingers, literally translating to “long fingers”. In Germany they are called Löffelbiskuit, which translates to “spoon biscuit”.

Ladyfingers are a principal ingredient in dessert recipes. Today, their more common usage is in trifles, charlottes, and tiramisu. They are typically soaked in a sugar syrup or liqueur, such as coffee for the tiramisu dessert.

Ladyfingers originated in the late 15th century at the court of the Duchy of Savoy, and were created to mark the occasion of a visit of the King of France.

Later they were given the name Savoiardi and recognised as an “official” court biscuit. They were particularly appreciated by the young members of the court and offered to visitors as a symbol of the local cuisine.

A flour-free version of the ladyfinger is a popular Passover dessert.

Source of information wikipedia

Ingredients

1/2 cup (65 grams) cake flour, sifted
3 large egg yolks, room temperature
2 tablespoons (25 grams) granulated white sugar, divided
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 large egg whites, room temperature
1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
3 tablespoons (36 grams) granulated white sugar
Powdered (icing or confectioners) sugar for dusting the tops of the cookies

Instructions

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (180 C) and line a baking sheets with parchment paper. Separate the egg yolk of the egg white. Beat the egg yolks and 2 tablespoons (25 grams) white sugar on high speed for about 5 minutes, or until the mixture becomes thick and pale yellow. Yes you do need to beat them for at least 5 minutes. Add in the vanilla extract. When you raise the beaters the batter should fall back into the bowl in a slow ribbon.

2. In a clean bowl, whip the egg whites until foamy. Add the cream of tartar and continue to beat until soft peaks form. Gradually add the 3 tablespoons (36 grams) white sugar and whip until stiff peaks form and the whites are glossy. Sift the cake flour over the egg batter but do not fold in. Then add the whipped whites into the egg yolk and flour mixture. Don’t over mix it.

3. Put the batter to the pastry bag, pipe the batter into 3 inch (7.5 cm) long ladyfingers. Place the powdered sugar in a wire strainer, and lightly sift the sugar over the tops of the cookies. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes or until the ladyfingers are firm but barely browned and are still spongy when pressed with a finger. Remove the baking sheets from the oven and slide the parchment paper from the baking sheets onto a wire rack. Let the ladyfingers cool for a few minutes and release them from the parchment paper, with a flat spatula, while they are still warm. If you left them completely cool before removing them from the parchment they stick and hard to remove without breaking. Finish cooling the ladyfingers on the wire rack before using or storing. If you are not using the ladyfingers right away, freeze them. Ladyfingers stale very quickly unless they are soaked in a liquid. To store, place in a plastic bag between layers of wax or parchment paper and freeze up to 2 weeks.


Yields 30

Lady Finger Cookies

30 minPrep Time

10 minCook Time

40 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup (65 grams) cake flour, sifted
  • 3 large egg yolks, room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons (25 grams) granulated white sugar, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 large egg whites, room temperature
  • 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 3 tablespoons (36 grams) granulated white sugar
  • Powdered (icing or confectioners) sugar for dusting the tops of the cookies

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (180 C) and line a baking sheets with parchment paper. Separate the egg yolk of the egg white. Beat the egg yolks and 2 tablespoons (25 grams) white sugar on high speed for about 5 minutes, or until the mixture becomes thick and pale yellow. Yes you do need to beat them for at least 5 minutes. Add in the vanilla extract. When you raise the beaters the batter should fall back into the bowl in a slow ribbon.
  2. In a clean bowl, whip the egg whites until foamy. Add the cream of tartar and continue to beat until soft peaks form. Gradually add the 3 tablespoons (36 grams) white sugar and whip until stiff peaks form and the whites are glossy. Sift the cake flour over the egg batter but do not fold in. Then add the whipped whites into the egg yolk and flour mixture. Don't over mix it.
  3. Put the batter to the pastry bag, pipe the batter into 3 inch (7.5 cm) long ladyfingers. Place the powdered sugar in a wire strainer, and lightly sift the sugar over the tops of the cookies. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes or until the ladyfingers are firm but barely browned and are still spongy when pressed with a finger. Remove the baking sheets from the oven and slide the parchment paper from the baking sheets onto a wire rack. Let the ladyfingers cool for a few minutes and release them from the parchment paper, with a flat spatula, while they are still warm. If you left them completely cool before removing them from the parchment they stick and hard to remove without breaking. Finish cooling the ladyfingers on the wire rack before using or storing. If you are not using the ladyfingers right away, freeze them. Ladyfingers stale very quickly unless they are soaked in a liquid. To store, place in a plastic bag between layers of wax or parchment paper and freeze up to 2 weeks.
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Chocolate Bourbon Cake

Mar 24, 2012 by

Down the street of my work is The Calvary Episcopal Church, located on 102 N. Second St. Downtown Memphis. This Church has a Memphis tradition dating back to 1928. People of different faiths gather during Lent to break bread together in Calvary’s Waffle Shop dining hall.

Last year was the first time I had the pleasure to taste this Chocolate Bourbon Cake. This year they had the same menu again and yes this Chocolate Bourbon Cake was there again. I asked for the recipe on Facebook, and lucky me and you they shared this recipe 🙂

Surprisingly this is one of the easiest cakes to make. If you are lucky you will be able to find the lady finger cookies at your local grocery store. Then it’s a no bake cake. If you are not that fortunate, you have to make your own lady fingers. No worry I have a recipe for that to.

Well this year (2014) the church was selling their cookbooks. Now you know I had to have one of those. I probably will make some other dishes out of their cookbook. But I don’t know about that fish pudding dish…………

Ingredients

1/2 lb (2 sticks) of unsalted butter
2 cups of sugar
6 squares unsweetened chocolate
6 eggs
3/4 cup chopped pecans
1/2 dozen lady fingers
2 oz. Bourbon
1 pint ( 2 cups) heavy cream

Instructions

1. Wet 2 standard loaf pans and line with Saran Wrap. Melt chocolate and cool slightly. Cream butter and sugar. Add melted chocolate and mix well. Add eggs one at a time beating well after each addition.

2. Whip the cream and season with Bourbon.

3. 1st layer: lady fingers that have been halved
2nd layer: 1/4 chocolate mixture per pan
3rd layer: 1/4 cup whipped cream mixture per pan
4th layer: 1/4 chopped pecans per pan
5th layer: lady fingers
6th layer: 1/4 chocolate mixture pan
7th layer: 1/4 whipped cream per pan
8th layer: 1/4 chopped pecans per pan

4. Cover each loaf pan with Saran Wrap and freeze. To serve, slice frozen and put on plates (it does not take long to thaw at room temperature).

 

Chocolate Bourbon Cake

30 minPrep Time

1 hrTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb (2 sticks) of unsalted butter
  • 2 cups of sugar
  • 6 squares unsweetened chocolate
  • 6 eggs
  • 3/4 cup chopped pecans
  • 1/2 dozen lady fingers
  • 2 oz. Bourbon
  • 1 pint ( 2 cups) heavy cream

Instructions

  1. Wet 2 standard loaf pans and line with Saran Wrap. Melt chocolate and cool slightly. Cream butter and sugar. Add melted chocolate and mix well. Add eggs one at a time beating well after each addition.
  2. Whip the cream and season with Bourbon.
  3. 1st layer: lady fingers that have been halved
  4. 2nd layer: 1/4 chocolate mixture per pan
  5. 3rd layer: 1/4 cup whipped cream mixture per pan
  6. 4th layer: 1/4 chopped pecans per pan
  7. 5th layer: lady fingers
  8. 6th layer: 1/4 chocolate mixture pan
  9. 7th layer: 1/4 whipped cream per pan
  10. 8th layer: 1/4 chopped pecans per pan
  11. Cover each loaf pan with Saran Wrap and freeze. To serve, slice frozen and put on plates (it does not take long to thaw at room temperature).
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Eel (paling) baked with Mustard Sauce (Dutch)

Mar 18, 2012 by

This is one of my favorite food that my mother prepared for us, and she made it again when I went home.

I did some research to find out why the eel is so expensive. And this is what I found out:

European eel is a ‘catadromous’ fish – that is, it spawns and is born at sea, and then migrates into inland waters to eat and grow. In the course of its life, it travels many thousands of miles, and passes through a number of very different stages, marked by changes in their colour.

European eel is now believed to spawn in the Sargasso Sea in the middle of the North Atlantic, whence the larvae then migrate to the coasts of Europe by drifting on the Gulf Stream. There they congregate in estuaries as glass eel, before metamorphosing into elvers and moving upstream. They spend most of their lifespan (6 to 20 years) in freshwater, where their bellies turn yellow. When the time comes for them to spawn, their skin turns silver and their stomachs dissolve. They then return downriver to swim back to the Sargasso Sea where their lives began.

European eels can live for over 80 years and reach up to 130cm in length, but average length of adults is around 60-80 cm, when they weigh around 1-2 kg.

The main fisheries for eel take place while they are migrating, when they are trapped and netted in estuaries and inshore waters. While traditional fisheries for local consumption tended to focus on adult eels, the last fifteen years have seen the emergence of a fishery for glass eels, which are exported to Asian markets where they are fattened in farms before being sold. As a result, the price of glass eel soared, to the point where in the mid-2000s it exceeded that of caviar.

The last twenty years have seen a dramatic decline in the number of eels reaching European river systems, which have fallen to as little as 1% of their previous levels according to some estimates. No one explanation can account for this phenomenon, which has been seen all over Europe. Possible causes, in addition to overfishing, include parasites, the damming of river systems for hydro-electric power, pollution, and changes to the course of the Gulf Stream

Ingredients

  • 3 lb eel
  • 2 rusk or 1/2 cup of bread crumbs
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 cups of water
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 stick of margarine
  • 2 tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 tbsp grainy mustard

Instructions

  1. Turn the oven on to 350F/180C. Wash the eel. Cut in 3 pieces.
  2. Add salt, chunks of margarine, to the eel. Crush the rusk (or use the bread crumbs), cover the eel with the rusk crumbs. Squeeze the lemon juice out of the lemon and pour over the eel. Add the 2 cups of water and put this dish in the preheated oven and bake for about 40 min, or until fork tender.
  3. Take the eel out of the oven dish and pour the liquid in a pan. Add 1 tbsp grainy mustard. (sorry no picture of that mom worked fast ;)) Dilute the cornstarch with water and add to the sauce. Whisk well. Pour over the eel.

Yields 3

Eel (Paling) baked with Mustard Sauce

15 minPrep Time

40 minCook Time

55 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 3 lb eel
  • 2 rusk or 1/2 cup of bread crumbs
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 cups of water
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 stick of margarine
  • 2 tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 tbsp grainy mustard

Instructions

  1. Turn the oven on to 350F/180C. Wash the eel. Cut in 3 pieces.
  2. Add salt, chunks of margarine, to the eel. Crush the rusk (or use the bread crumbs), cover the eel with the rusk crumbs. Squeeze the lemon juice out of the lemon and pour over the eel. Add the 2 cups of water and put this dish in the preheated oven and bake for about 40 min, or until fork tender.
  3. Take the eel out of the oven dish and pour the liquid in a pan. Add 1 tbsp grainy mustard. (sorry no picture of that mom worked fast ;)) Dilute the cornstarch with water and add to the sauce. Whisk well. Pour over the eel.
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BBQ Chicken Pizza

Feb 2, 2012 by

The word pizza is believed to be from an Old Italian word meaning “a point,” which in turn became the Italian word “pizzicare,” which means “to pinch” or “pluck.” Pizza has been a basic part of the Italian diet for a long time. Most people associate pizza with Italie. It is also said that the idea of using bread as a plate cam from the Greeks.

Umberto I (1844-1900), King of Italy, and his wife, Queen Margherita di Savoia (1851-1926), in Naples on holiday, called to their palace the most popular of the pizzaioli (pizza chef), Raffaele Esposito, to taste his specialties. He prepared three kinds of pizzas: one with pork fat, cheese, and basil; one with garlic, oil, and tomatoes; and another with mozzarella, basil, and tomatoes (in the colors of the Italian flag). The Queen liked the last kind of pizza so much that she sent to the pizzzaiolo a letter to thank him saying, “I assure you that the three kinds of pizza you have prepared were very delicious.” Raffaele Esposito dedicated his specialty to the Queen and called it “Pizza Margherita.” This pizza set the standard by which today’s pizza evolved as well as firmly established Naples as the pizza capitol of the world.

In the late 19th century, pizza was sold in the streets in Naples at breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It was cut from a large tray that had been cooked in the baker’s oven and had a simple topping of mushrooms and anchovies. As pizza became more popular, stalls were set up where the dough was shaped as customers ordered. Various toppings were invented. The stalls soon developed into the pizzeria, an open-air place for people to congregate, eat, drink, and talk.

Pizza migrated to America with the Italians in the latter half of the 19th century. Pizza was introduced to Chicago by a peddler who walked up and down Taylor Street with a metal washtub of pizzas on his head, crying his wares at two cents a chew. This was the traditional way pizza used to be sold in Naples, in copper cylindrical drums with false bottoms that were packed with charcoal from the oven to keep the pizzas hot. The name of the pizzeria was embossed on the drum. For many people, especially among the Italian-American population, the first American pizzas were known as Tomato Pie. Even in the present 21st century, present-day tomato pie is most commonly found in the Northeastern United States, especially in Italian bakeries in central New York. Tomato pies are built the opposite of pizza pies – first the cheese, then the toppings, and then the sauce. In case you would like to read more about the history of Pizza I Found this story on whats cooking America.

Ingredients

For the crust
  • 1 1/3 cup water
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 tbsp. cornmeal
  • 3 cups bread flour
  • 1/4 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp onion powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp instant yeast
For the topping
  • 3 boneless skinless chicken thighs
  • 1/2 cup BBQ sauce
  • 1/8 cup red onion sliced
  • 1 cup Mozzarella cheese
  • 2 tbsp Cilantro

Instructions

  1. Before you start turn the oven on to 350F. When you are finished making the dough this is where I put the dough on top of the stove to rise.
  2. Place water, sugar, yeast in bowl and let it sit for 5 min till frothy. Add olive oil to the yeast mix.
  3. Then add the bread flour and salt. Knead with dough hook to form a soft, but not-too sticky dough (about 10 minutes).
  4. Put a little olive oil in the bowl. Add the pizza dough and cover with plastic wrap or a towel. Put the bowl on the preheated oven so the dough can rise
  5. In the mean time prepare the boneless skinless chicken thigh. Put 1 tbsp olive oil in a hot skillet brown the chicken on both sides for about 5 min each or until cooked through. Remove chicken to cutting board and let rest 5 minutes. Cut into bite size pieces.
  6. Remove from machine and allow to rest, in a bowl with olive oil on the bottom so it won’t stick. Cover with plastic wrap or a tea towel for about 45 minutes. Set the oven now to 425F. 1 Check if the dough has risen. If it has, take it out and split it in 4 balls. Put them on a greased baking sheet and cover again, and let it rise again for another 15 min. Then take one of the balls and flatten on a floured surface
  7. Roll the dough out to the size you would like the pizza to be. Spread BBQ sauce of your choice over the crust. Top with onions and cheese. Evenly top with pieces of chicken. Bake on middle rack for 12-15 min, until cheese is bubbly and crust is browned. Sprinkle with cilantro before serving.

BBQ Chicken Pizza

1 hr, 10 Prep Time

15 minCook Time

1 hr, 25 Total Time

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Ingredients

    For the crust
  • 1 1/3 cup water
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 tbsp. cornmeal
  • 3 cups bread flour
  • 1/4 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp onion powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp instant yeast
  • For the topping
  • 3 boneless skinless chicken thighs
  • 1/2 cup BBQ sauce
  • 1/8 cup red onion sliced
  • 1 cup Mozzarella cheese
  • 2 tbsp Cilantro

Instructions

  1. Before you start turn the oven on to 350F. When you are finished making the dough this is where I put the dough on top of the stove to rise.
  2. Place water, sugar, yeast in bowl and let it sit for 5 min till frothy. Add olive oil to the yeast mix.
  3. Then add the bread flour and salt. Knead with dough hook to form a soft, but not-too sticky dough (about 10 minutes).
  4. Put a little olive oil in the bowl. Add the pizza dough and cover with plastic wrap or a towel. Put the bowl on the preheated oven so the dough can rise
  5. In the mean time prepare the boneless skinless chicken thigh. Put 1 tbsp olive oil in a hot skillet brown the chicken on both sides for about 5 min each or until cooked through. Remove chicken to cutting board and let rest 5 minutes. Cut into bite size pieces.
  6. Remove from machine and allow to rest, in a bowl with olive oil on the bottom so it won't stick. Cover with plastic wrap or a tea towel for about 45 minutes. Set the oven now to 425F. 1 Check if the dough has risen. If it has, take it out and split it in 4 balls. Put them on a greased baking sheet and cover again, and let it rise again for another 15 min. Then take one of the balls and flatten on a floured surface
  7. Roll the dough out to the size you would like the pizza to be. Spread BBQ sauce of your choice over the crust. Top with onions and cheese. Evenly top with pieces of chicken. Bake on middle rack for 12-15 min, until cheese is bubbly and crust is browned. Sprinkle with cilantro before serving.
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Spaetzle

Feb 1, 2012 by

In Europe spaetzle is largely considered a “Swabian speciality” and is generally associated with the German states of Baden-Wuertttemberg and Bavaria. Before the invention and use of mechanical devices to make these noodles, they were shaped by hand or with a spoon and the results resembled Spatzen (meaning little sparrows, sparrow is Haus-Spatz or Sperling in German).

Spaetzle dough typically consists of few ingredients, principally eggs, flour, and salt. Often, water is added to produce a thinner dough. Traditionally, Spaetzle is made by scraping dough off a wooden chopping board (Spaetzlebrett) into boiling salt water where they cook until they rise to the surface. They are then skimmed and put aside. several devices were invented to facilitate cooking that resemble a strainer, (or colander), a potato ricer (“Spaetzlespresse”), a food mill or coarse grater (“Spaetzlehobel”). Like with scraped Spaetzle, the dough drops into the boiling water. Since I don’t own one of those devises I just used the regular colander and spatula.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 beaten eggs
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp chicken base (if you don’t have that 2 chicken bouillon cubes will do
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • butter
  • pepper

Instructions

  1. Fill a large pot half way full with water. Add 2 tbsp chicken base or 2 bouillon cubes to the water. In the meantime add 2 beaten eggs, 3/4 cup of milk and salt to the flour in the mixing bowl, mix well. When the bouillon starts to boil put your colander on top of your pot. Pour the spaetzle mix in the colander and push it through with a spatula. The spaetzle is ready when it’s floating to the top. Take the spaetzle with a skimmer out of the bouillon and rinse with cold water. When you are finished making the spaetzle put some butter in a skillet and add your spaetzle to the skillet. This is just to brown it a bit. You don’t have to fry the spaetzle, you can put the spaetzle in a bowl with some butter. For variety you can add some chives, garlic, green onion, or some cheese. Sprinkle with some salt and pepper.

Spaetzle

In Europe spaetzle is largely considered a "Swabian speciality" and is generally associated with the German states of Baden-Wuertttemberg and Bavaria. Before the invention and use of mechanical devices to make these noodles, they were shaped by hand or with a spoon and the results resembled Spatzen (meaning little sparrows, sparrow is Haus-Spatz or Sperling in German).

10 minPrep Time

10 minCook Time

20 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 beaten eggs
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp chicken base (if you don't have that 2 chicken bouillon cubes will do
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • butter
  • pepper

Instructions

  1. Fill a large pot half way full with water. Add 2 tbsp chicken base or 2 bouillon cubes to the water. In the meantime add 2 beaten eggs, 3/4 cup of milk and salt to the flour in the mixing bowl, mix well. When the bouillon starts to boil put your colander on top of your pot. Pour the spaetzle mix in the colander and push it through with a spatula. The spaetzle is ready when it's floating to the top. Take the spaetzle with a skimmer out of the bouillon and rinse with cold water. When you are finished making the spaetzle put some butter in a skillet and add your spaetzle to the skillet. This is just to brown it a bit. You don't have to fry the spaetzle, you can put the spaetzle in a bowl with some butter. For variety you can add some chives, garlic, green onion, or some cheese. Sprinkle with some salt and pepper.
Cuisine: German | Recipe Type: Side Dish
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Potato, Parmesan Baked

Jan 31, 2012 by

 


Ingredients

  • 4 Large Potatoes
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 cup of hot milk
  • 1 stick melted butter
  • 3 green onions
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tsp paprika

Instructions

  1. Wash and scrub the potatoes, and microwave them till done (how long that depends on your microwave), mine takes about 15 min.
  2. Slice the top off. Scoop the inside out. Add to the potatoes, the egg, hot milk, melted butter. And mix it with the mixer. Add the green onions, and parmesan cheese. Fill the potatoes, sprinkle with pepper and paprika, and with a little left over of the melted butter. Bake in a 350F oven for about 30 min.

Parmesan Baked Potato

10 minPrep Time

45 minCook Time

55 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 4 Large Potatoes
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 cup of hot milk
  • 1 stick melted butter
  • 3 green onions
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tsp paprika

Instructions

  1. Wash and scrub the potatoes, and microwave them till done (how long that depends on your microwave), mine takes about 15 min.
  2. Slice the top off. Scoop the inside out. Add to the potatoes, the egg, hot milk, melted butter. And mix it with the mixer. Add the green onions, and parmesan cheese. Fill the potatoes, sprinkle with pepper and paprika, and with a little left over of the melted butter. Bake in a 350F oven for about 30 min.
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Banana Nut Bread

Jan 29, 2012 by

 

Banana bread first became a standard feature of American cookbooks with the popularization of baking soda and baking powder in the 1930s, appears in Pillsbury’s 1933 Balanced Recipes cookbook,and later gained more acceptance with the release of the original Chiquita Banana’s Recipe Book in 1950. The origin of the first banana bread recipe is unknown, though some speculate it was originated in the 18th century by housewives experimenting with pearlash. The home baking revival of the 1960s and the simplicity of its recipe led to an explosion in banana bread’s popularity.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup butter, softened
  • 1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups mashed bananas, about 4 medium
  • 1/2 cup chopped pecans
  • 1/2 cup tropical medley
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup chopped, toasted pecans
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Instructions

1. Beat butter and cream cheese at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add sugar, beat until light and fluffy. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating just until blended after each addition. Add the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt, beat at low speed just until blended. beating at low speed just until blended.

2. Add the vanilla. Mash the bananas and stir in the bananas, pecans, tropical medley.

3. Spoon batter into 2 greased and floured 8- x 4-inch loaf pans. Stir together brown sugar, 1/4 cup pecans, 1/4 cup tropical medley,1 tablespoon flour, 1 tablespoon melted butter, and cinnamon. Sprinkle mixture evenly over batter. Bake at 350° for 1 hour or until a long wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean and sides pull away from pan, shielding with aluminum foil last 15 minutes to prevent browning, if necessary. Cool bread in pans on wire racks 10 minutes. Remove from pans, and cool 30 minutes on wire racks before slicing.

Banana Nut Bread

20 minPrep Time

1 hrCook Time

1 hr, 20 Total Time

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Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup butter, softened
  • 1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups mashed bananas, about 4 medium
  • 1/2 cup chopped pecans
  • 1/2 cup tropical medley
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup chopped, toasted pecans
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Beat butter and cream cheese at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add sugar, beat until light and fluffy. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating just until blended after each addition. Add the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt, beat at low speed just until blended. beating at low speed just until blended.
  2. Add the vanilla. Mash the bananas and stir in the bananas, pecans, tropical medley.
  3. Spoon batter into 2 greased and floured 8- x 4-inch loaf pans. Stir together brown sugar, 1/4 cup pecans, 1/4 cup tropical medley,1 tablespoon flour, 1 tablespoon melted butter, and cinnamon. Sprinkle mixture evenly over batter. Bake at 350° for 1 hour or until a long wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean and sides pull away from pan, shielding with aluminum foil last 15 minutes to prevent browning, if necessary. Cool bread in pans on wire racks 10 minutes. Remove from pans, and cool 30 minutes on wire racks before slicing.
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Bread, Artisan

Jan 28, 2012 by

 

Ingredients

  • 3 cups lukewarm water
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons granulated yeast (2 packets)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt or 1 1/2 tablespoons other coarse salt
  • 6 1/2 cups flour, unsifted, unbleached, all-purpose (not strong)

Instructions

  1. Preparing Dough for Storage:.
  2. Warm the water slightly. It should feel just a little warmer than body temperature. Warm water will rise the dough to the right point for storage in about 2 hours. With cold water it will need 3-4 hours.
  3. Add the yeast to the water in a 5 quart bowl or, preferably, in a resealable, lidded (not airtight) plastic food container or food-grade bucket. Don’t worry about getting it all to dissolve.
  4. Mix in the flour and salt – kneading is unnecessary. Add all of the flour at once, measuring it in with dry-ingredient measuring cups, by gently scooping up the flour, then sweeping the top level with a knife or spatula. Don’t press down into the flour as you scoop or you’ll throw off the measurement. Mix with a wooden spoon, a high-capacity food processor (14 cups or larger) fitted with the dough attachment, or a heavy duty stand mixer fitted with the dough hook until the mixture is uniform. If you’re hand mixing and it becomes too difficult to incorporate all the flour with the spoon, you can reach into your mixing vessel with very wet hands and press the mixture together. Don’t knead, it isn’t necessary. You’re finished when everything is uniformly moist, without dry patches. It takes a few minutes, and will yield a dough that is wet and loose enough to conform to the shape of its container.
  5. Allow to rise. Cover with lid (not airtight or it could explode the lid off). Allow the mixture to rise at room temperature until it begins to collapse (or at least flattens on the top), approx 2 hours, depending on room temperature, and initial water temperature Longer rising times, up to 5 hours, won’t harm the result.
  6. You can use a portion of the dough any time after this period. Fully refrigerated dough is less sticky and easier to work with than dough at room temperature.
  7. On Baking Day:.
  8. Prepare your loaf tin, tray, or whatever you’re baking it in/on. Sprinkle the surface of your refrigerated dough with four. Pull up and cut of a grapefruit-size piece of dough (c 1 lb), using a serrated knife.
  9. Hold the mass of dough in your hands and add a little more flour as needed so it won’t stick to your hands. Gently stretch the surface of the dough around to the bottom on all 4 sides, rotating the ball a quarter-turn as you go. Most of the dusting flour will fall off – that’s fine, it isn’t meant to be incorporated. The bottom of the loaf may appear to be a collection of bunched ends, but it will sort itself out during resting and baking.
  10. The correctly shaped final product will be smooth and cohesive. The entire process should take no more than 30 – 60 seconds.
  11. Rest the loaf and let it rise in the form, on the tray/pizza peel, for about 40 minutes Depending on the age of the dough, you may not see much rise during this period. That’s fine, more rising will occur during baking.
  12. Twenty minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 450F Place an empty broiler tray for holding water on any other shelf that won’t interfere with the rising bread.
  13. Dust and Slash. Dust the top of the loaf liberally with flour, which will allow the slashing knife to pass without sticking. Slash a quarter inch deep cross, diagonal lines, or tic-tac-toe pattern on top using a serrated knife.
  14. After a 20 min preheat you’re ready to bake, even though the oven thermometer won’t be at full temperature yet. Put your loaf in the oven. Pour about 1 cup of hot water (from the tap) into the broiler tray and close the oven to trap the steam.
  15. Bake for about 30 minutes, or until the crust is nicely browned and firm to the touch.
  16. Store the rest of the dough in the fridge in your lidded (not airtight) container and use it over the next 14 days. The flavour and texture improves, becoming like sourdough. Even 24 hours of storage improves the flavour.
  17. This is the standard bread. There are loads of variations – both savory and sweet – in the book.

Artisan Bread
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Ingredients

  • 3 cups lukewarm water
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons granulated yeast (2 packets)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt or 1 1/2 tablespoons other coarse salt
  • 6 1/2 cups flour, unsifted, unbleached, all-purpose (not strong)

Instructions

  1. Preparing Dough for Storage:.
  2. Warm the water slightly. It should feel just a little warmer than body temperature. Warm water will rise the dough to the right point for storage in about 2 hours. With cold water it will need 3-4 hours.
  3. Add the yeast to the water in a 5 quart bowl or, preferably, in a resealable, lidded (not airtight) plastic food container or food-grade bucket. Don't worry about getting it all to dissolve.
  4. Mix in the flour and salt - kneading is unnecessary. Add all of the flour at once, measuring it in with dry-ingredient measuring cups, by gently scooping up the flour, then sweeping the top level with a knife or spatula. Don't press down into the flour as you scoop or you'll throw off the measurement. Mix with a wooden spoon, a high-capacity food processor (14 cups or larger) fitted with the dough attachment, or a heavy duty stand mixer fitted with the dough hook until the mixture is uniform. If you're hand mixing and it becomes too difficult to incorporate all the flour with the spoon, you can reach into your mixing vessel with very wet hands and press the mixture together. Don't knead, it isn't necessary. You're finished when everything is uniformly moist, without dry patches. It takes a few minutes, and will yield a dough that is wet and loose enough to conform to the shape of its container.
  5. Allow to rise. Cover with lid (not airtight or it could explode the lid off). Allow the mixture to rise at room temperature until it begins to collapse (or at least flattens on the top), approx 2 hours, depending on room temperature, and initial water temperature Longer rising times, up to 5 hours, won't harm the result.
  6. You can use a portion of the dough any time after this period. Fully refrigerated dough is less sticky and easier to work with than dough at room temperature.
  7. On Baking Day:.
  8. Prepare your loaf tin, tray, or whatever you're baking it in/on. Sprinkle the surface of your refrigerated dough with four. Pull up and cut of a grapefruit-size piece of dough (c 1 lb), using a serrated knife.
  9. Hold the mass of dough in your hands and add a little more flour as needed so it won't stick to your hands. Gently stretch the surface of the dough around to the bottom on all 4 sides, rotating the ball a quarter-turn as you go. Most of the dusting flour will fall off - that's fine, it isn't meant to be incorporated. The bottom of the loaf may appear to be a collection of bunched ends, but it will sort itself out during resting and baking.
  10. The correctly shaped final product will be smooth and cohesive. The entire process should take no more than 30 - 60 seconds.
  11. Rest the loaf and let it rise in the form, on the tray/pizza peel, for about 40 minutes Depending on the age of the dough, you may not see much rise during this period. That's fine, more rising will occur during baking.
  12. Twenty minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 450F Place an empty broiler tray for holding water on any other shelf that won't interfere with the rising bread.
  13. Dust and Slash. Dust the top of the loaf liberally with flour, which will allow the slashing knife to pass without sticking. Slash a quarter inch deep cross, diagonal lines, or tic-tac-toe pattern on top using a serrated knife.
  14. After a 20 min preheat you're ready to bake, even though the oven thermometer won't be at full temperature yet. Put your loaf in the oven. Pour about 1 cup of hot water (from the tap) into the broiler tray and close the oven to trap the steam.
  15. Bake for about 30 minutes, or until the crust is nicely browned and firm to the touch.
  16. Store the rest of the dough in the fridge in your lidded (not airtight) container and use it over the next 14 days. The flavour and texture improves, becoming like sourdough. Even 24 hours of storage improves the flavour.
  17. This is the standard bread. There are loads of variations - both savory and sweet - in the book.
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Bacon Brie Quiche

Jan 27, 2012 by


Bacon Brie Quiche: In French Cuisine the Quiche is a classic dish. But it actually originated from Germany. The word Quiche is from the German word Kuechen. the original Quiche Lorraine was an open pie with filling consisting of an egg and cream custard with smoked bacon and or pork pieces. It was only later that cheese was added to Quiche Lorraine. Add onion and you have Quiche Alsacienne. The bottom crust originally made from dough, but that has long since evolved into a short-crust of puff pastry crust. Quiche became very popular in England after WWII, and the U.S. in the 50’s
Bacon Brie Quiche: In French Cuisine the Quiche is a classic dish. But it actually originated from Germany. The word Quiche is from the German word Kuechen. the original Quiche Lorraine was an open pie with filling consisting of an egg and cream custard with smoked bacon and or pork pieces. It was only later that cheese was added to Quiche Lorraine. Add onion and you have Quiche Alsacienne. The bottom crust originally made from dough, but that has long since evolved into a short-crust of puff pastry crust. Quiche became very popular in England after WWII, and the U.S. in the 50’s

Ingredients

1 deep pastry pie shell
1 bunch of chives
1 box of Brie (4 oz)
1 cup of shredded Swiss cheese
5 strips of thick cooked bacon
1/2 tsp white pepper
1/2 tsp dill weed
1/2 cup Greek Yoghurt or sour cream
5 eggs
1/ 2 cup half and half or heavy whipping cream

Instructions
1.  Bake the pastry shell in a preheated oven for 4 min. Mix the eggs and half and half and sour cream, set aside.   

2. Put the shredded cheese in the bottom of the pie crust then add the sliced Brie. Next layer add the cooked bacon. Add the chives and white pepper and dill to the egg mixture. Pour over the bacon. Bake in a preheated 375F oven for about 45 minutes, until a pick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool slightly before serving.

Bacon Brie Quiche

Bacon Brie Quiche: In French Cuisine the Quiche is a classic dish. But it actually originated from Germany. The word Quiche is from the German word Kuechen. the original Quiche Lorraine was an open pie with filling consisting of an egg and cream custard with smoked bacon and or pork pieces. It was only later that cheese was added to Quiche Lorraine. Add onion and you have Quiche Alsacienne. The bottom crust originally made from dough, but that has long since evolved into a short-crust of puff pastry crust. Quiche became very popular in England after WWII, and the U.S. in the 50's

15 minPrep Time

45 minCook Time

1 hrTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 1 deep pastry pie shell
  • 1 bunch of chives
  • 1 box of Brie (4 oz)
  • 1 cup of shredded Swiss cheese
  • 5 strips of thick cooked bacon
  • 1/2 tsp white pepper
  • 1/2 tsp dill weed
  • 1/2 cup Greek Yoghurt or sour cream
  • 5 eggs
  • 1/ 2 cup half and half or heavy whipping cream

Instructions

  1. Bake the pastry shell in a preheated oven for 4 min. Mix the eggs and half and half and sour cream, set aside.
  2. Put the shredded cheese in the bottom of the pie crust then add the sliced Brie. Next layer add the cooked bacon. Add the chives and white pepper and dill to the egg mixture. Pour over the bacon. Bake in a preheated 375F oven for about 45 minutes, until a pick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool slightly before serving.
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